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Annex X - The Harvard Analytical Framework

The Harvard Analytical Framework is outlined in A Case Book: Gender Roles in Development Projects edited by Catherine Overholt, Mary B. Anderson, Kathleen Cloud, James E. Austin (Kumariyan Press, 1985).

This framework is a useful data gathering tool that charts and organizes information and can be adapted to many situations. The information collected can be as general or as detailed and sector specific as required. The Framework can be an effective training and consciousness-raising tool, both within development organizations, and at the community level.

The Framework is used to develop a description and analysis of gender relations in a given community; but it provides no guidance in determining development directions. The gender analysis presented in this kit combines elements of the Harvard Analytical Framework with such concepts as women's subordination, development approach that strives for social justice and the full participation and self-determination of women and men.

The Harvard Analytical Framework has three main components:

  1. The Activity Profile - identifies all relevant productive and reproductive tasks and addresses the question: Who does what? For our purposes, a Community Work category can be added to complete the information base. Depending on the context, the time, frequency and location of work may also be indicated and additional subgroups can be added (eg: girls/boys, elder women/men).
  2. The Access and Control Profile: Resources and Benefits - identifies and lists the resources used to carry out the work identified in the Activity Profile. It indicates who has access to resources and control over their use. Categories may be added for political and economic resources, and the resource of time. Benefits realized from household (and community) production and use of resources are also identified and listed. Columns indicate whether or not women and men have access to them and control over their use.
  3. The Influencing Factors - charts the factors which affect the gender differentiations identified in the Profiles. Identifying past and present influences can give an indication of shifts and trends for the future. These factors can also be considered for the opportunities and constraints they present for increasing the involvement of women in development projects and programs.

Questions to be asked - Case study using the framework:

1. ACTIVITY PROFILE
A. Production Activities
Agriculture:
- activity 1
- activity 2, etc.
Income Generating:
- activity 1
- activity 2, etc.
Employment:
- activity 1
- activity 2, etc.
Other:
  
  
B.Reproductive Activities
Water related:
- activity 1
- activity 2
Fuel related:
Food preparation:
Childcare:
Health related:
Cleaning and repair:
Market related:
Other:
  
  
2. ACCESS AND CONTROL PROFILE
A. Resources
Land
Equipment
Labour
Cash
Educational/Training, etc.
Other
Access
Women Men
Control
Women Men
B.Benefits
Outside income
Asset Ownership
Basic needs (food, clothing, shelter)
Education
Political Power/prestige, etc.
Other
  
  
2. ACCESS AND CONTROL PROFILE
  Impact? Opportunities? Constraints?
Political
Economic
Cultural
Educational
Environmental
Legal
International
Other
  
  
  

 

 

 

Comments: Webadministrator@wfp.org
Revised: March 24, 1998
: 1998-2000, World Food Programme. All rights reserved.